Magic Carpet Ride on an F-18

The generosity of people on the internet never fails to amaze me. We have free access to inspiring sights and sounds because of people like this pilot and the people who edited his video.
Magic_f18_ride
This exhilarating video of an unknown Navy Pilot in his F-18 Hornet is awe-inspiring, and the sound track combines the sound of the Hornet in flight with "Magic Carpet Ride" by Steppenwolf. Make sure your speakers are on.

The entire video is spent inside the cockpit of an F-18, from catapult launch, to landing back on the carrier with a thumbs-up. You’ll really feel like you’re riding on a "magic carpet" as the pilot puts his Hornet through its paces over the open ocean.

You will share the pilot’s joy in his prowess as you watch this video. He is truly free from the constraints of gravity.

If the above link doesn’t work on your system, you can download this video in many other formats.

Many thanks to Ryan Hickman, of grouchymedia.com , who has many other fine videos available for downloading.

This entry was posted in Friends in Far Places. Bookmark the permalink.

0 Responses to Magic Carpet Ride on an F-18

  1. dan david says:

    You will share the pilot’s joy in his prowess as you watch this. He is truly free from the constraints of gravity. You can just imagine him singing along to “Magic Carpet Ride”.

    The pilot is free from the constraints of gravity but he is tied to the constraints of high G’s and the strict discipline of the military.

    Flying a military jet is serious business.
    The pilot is responsible for matters of lives and lot’s of money. This pilot has a mission to achieve and in the same time watch the safety of him self, his friends and ship. The cost of the plane and of hour of flying is huge and it comes from the pocket of US tax payer.

  2. I think you have missed the point.

    That pilot was doing his job, and he has to put in his hours to stay certified. If he could stay certified for carrier flight in a simulator, things would be quite different.

    If you watched that video, you could see how little time he had to land and stop. You don’t get that expertise without constant training and practice. The sure handling of the plane showed tremendous discipline. There was nothing reckless about any of those moves.

    I am sure that many flights are video taped and that most pilots are enthusiastic about their work. If you watched him flying, you would have seen how alert he was.

    Flying skill and seriousness have no correlation. People only get serious when they are afraid of losing control.

    You should not get serious about this either. You did realize that the Steppenwolf soundtrack was dubbed in afterwards? Right? I mean, we aren’t talking about an F-18 boombox here. Every one of the videos from that site has music dubbed in… just like the newsreels.

  3. Marty says:

    Sweet Flight. My Huey was considerably slower. Thanks for the speed.

  4. dan david says:

    David, you wrote: “People only get serious when they are afraid of losing control.”

    In my country I serve in the army reserve. I am not a pilot, I belong to ground troops. When I drive on heavy things on the ground or on light jeeps I take it very seriously. I have seen to many accidents in the army which took place when the driver of a tank/armed carrier/jeep was having to much “fun”.

    When I drive in the army I am serious… A turn over of one of those heavy things usually end with injured/dead people. Do I have good conrol when I drive? The answer is YES. Am I afraid of “losing control”? The answer is Yes again.

    Thinking that flying an F18 is “fun” and presenting it like a theme park with disco music is a sure mark for both immaturity and not having to face reality.

  5. Serious people tend to regard life as an ordeal. Thanks for making my point.

    I was a tank commander when I was in the service. Being responsible for a crew and the expensive and dangerous tank required competence, alertness and good control. We were trained to the point where we could expertly carry out our orders. We took pride in our competence and were generally cheerful executing our duties.

    The people I knew who were serious, were the ones who were afraid of losing control, of turning a tank end-over-end, or of losing a tread, because they had not drilled long enough to achieve effortless competence. The opposite of seriousness is not fun, it is effortless competence.

  6. dan david says:

    David, few weeks ago I was in a reserve exercise.
    Did I have fun driving a light jeep? YES.
    But in one time we were escorting a truck.
    Captain jeep goes first. The the truck. Last my jeep.
    The captain & his driver were going out of limit speed.
    We were driving off the road. It was like a mountain road. Very bumpy. The other driver was forcing us to go fast. He was driving recklessly fast because he was having “fun”. The first time we stopped, I gave both captain & his driver few strong words. Although I am only a plain soldier in the reserve, when safety is concerned I don’t care much about rank. After that their driving was much more careful.

    To sum it up, driving on a bumpy way is fun but you must be very careful. The worst enemy you can have there is to feel too good.

    I quote you “because they had not drilled long enough to achieve effortless competence.” The sentence is very nice English (by now you know it’s my second language).
    drill long = practice. effortless competence is nice expression for well practices. I’d say that I will agree with that sentence and that it applies for 99% of the time, that is “effortless competence”. But life present it’s surprises when you least expect them.

  7. Very well done on taking responsibility for the safety of the group. I salute your courage in speaking up when you could have kept quiet.

    I was not able to tell that English is your second language because your writing is better than that of many Americans. It is a common joke that you can usually spot foreign speakers by the fact that their English is better than ours.

    I’m glad to see you visiting my weblog. Send me an email if you would like me to address a particular subject.

  8. Chris says:

    I loved the clip. I took it as intended, I’m sure – a way to put folks who will never, ever experience this first hand into the cockpit.

    Its funny how the web, with its inherent lack of context, tends to spark controversy where there isn’t any. Or maybe acts as a vehicle for delivering controversy is a better term. I think the implication in the original comment on “maybe this isn’t serious and flying’s a serious business” and “hey – that costs a bunch of money and I’m paying for it” were both a stretch.

    I fly in a helicopter once in a while, and have taken loads of pictures and video and its always well received by folks who – like above – will never experience it themselves. Its a trauma helicopter – am I somehow advocating trauma, being irresponsible or otherwise being immature in presenting the material – I don’t think so.

    Thanks for posting the info, David. I’m tracking-back to you on it, and posting on blahgKarma.

    Rock on.

  9. Name says:

    Just as you suggest, the video was intended to share a unique experience. Taxpayers spend a tremendous amount of money to put aviators in high performance aircaft. Those aviators have a responsibility to be prepared to employ their aircraft when called upon. I don’t see a problem with bringing a camera along unless it interferes with training, causes a safety issue, or the footage is used inappropriately. I didn’t think any of those were at issue with this video.

  10. Truffy says:

    Yep, great video. I too am a bit perplexed though at the “mission” portayed here. Have a careful look. It appears that he is practicing for a handling display at an airshow or something, using the cloud tops as his lower limit. Why then at 1 minute 18 seconds does he release what appears to be an unguided weapon from his left wing pylon? I only noticed it after a few looks at this video. Its possible that there are 2 videos editied together – which doesn nothing to detract from the greatness of it, but I would be interested in what any others think about this, especially since it happens at some altitude (above the Cumulus tops)
    Cheers

  11. Name says:

    Wasn’t practicing for an airshow, just having fun during some precious free moments in the airplane. You’re right, I was using the clouds as a lower limit, but only to make the video look more interesting. The footage was collected on several flights from the USS Kittyhawk in the Pacific during the Spring of 2001 (you may notice that my flight suit changes color a few times). I wasn’t trying to portray any particular mission, I just put together the most interesting clips. The bomb was a 500 lb. Mk 82 dropped on a range in Australia.

  12. Name says:

    Wasn’t practicing for an airshow, just having fun during some precious free moments in the airplane. You’re right, I was using the clouds as a lower limit, but only to make the video look more interesting. The footage was collected on several flights from the USS Kittyhawk in the Pacific during the Spring of 2001 (you may notice that my flight suit changes color a few times). I wasn’t trying to portray any particular mission, I just put together the most interesting clips. The bomb was a 500 lb. Mk 82 dropped on a range in Australia.

  13. Brian says:

    Do you plan on making anymore videos?

    -Brian

  14. NavyNurse-Damn Proud of It!! says:

    Great, great video!! I got it last year via email and then it accidentally got erased. Eureka- I have found it again! I served several years in the Navy and Reserve. During that time, I met many, many people from all branches of the service and almost all were very dedicated to their jobs and their service to their country. They did not “play” with their responsibilities or their equipment. However, they did know how to have fun also. Most people who have been in high level stress situations know that you need to be able to have a release and lighten up sometimes. This pilot obviously has great skill- as evidenced by his take off and landings on a carrier. This is a very exacting skill- no forgivness for errors. This is an awesome video and I thank the pilot for sharing it with all of us. For the record- I was a nurse during the first Gulf War and our platform was a MASH unit with the front lines. No sissies here!!

  15. Wolfgang says:

    The Best great Video with sound I’ve ever heard the last 10 Year’s.
    I loved the clip.
    It’s very good.
    Regards from Germany.

    Wolle

  16. bluecoat says:

    “Thinking that flying an F18 is “fun” and presenting it like a theme park with disco music is a sure mark for both immaturity and not having to face reality.”

    No offense, but that is why you are not an aviator.

    I have lots of respect for the army, and this isn’t meant as an argument, but it takes a certain type of person to strap into what is basically a guided missile full of fuel and with bombs attached…then ascend to those heights and pull those maneuvers. Yes it’s all business up there, but if you let the reality of it set in so does fear. There is no room for fear in the cockpit, of any aircraft.

    Any pilot will tell you, there is nothing more fun or more surreal than flying.

  17. Mabel says:

    I want to find out how I can get my fiance a ride experience in this kind of jets, f-14 or f-18. please let me know if you can help me. I live in Vegas thank you so much.

  18. Terri L. says:

    My husband has always wanted to fly in an F18 and I would like to give him that as a gift, do you offer anything like that? And if so, what is the cost?

  19. bluecoat says:

    No civilian will be able to ride in US fighter aircraft, under most circumstances. It takes a lot even for non-pilot military personnel to get a ride in one. This entails much training, physical tests, and extensive security checks and the security clearance needed just to look inside, let alone ride. Security clearances go for up to $100K, and will not be granted unless needed. So the chances are slim to none. However, I hear the russians or other countries offer flights in MIG’s for an outrageous price…MIG’s such as the MIG-29 are great aircraft. Keep in mind, they don’t have the same funding for proper maintenance, training, skill, or safety that our pilots do…

    Best advice, get them a flight in a WW2 era prop fighter, an acrobatic plane, or something like that. It will be more than enough.
    —–
    PING:
    TITLE: Magic Carpet Ride…
    URL: http://blahgkarma.blogspot.com/2005/02/magic-carpet-ride-on-f-18.html
    IP: 72.9.234.70
    BLOG NAME: blahgKarma
    DATE: 02/27/2005 03:29:07 PM
    Cool media of the day – video of a Navy pilot flying an F-18 Hornet, all filmed in the cockpit, takeoff to landing – courtesy of David at Ripples and grouchymedia.com. You gotta see this…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

sixty seven − sixty one =