A time to plant – with one difference

Deck-Planter

It’s the season when we sit out on our back deck and marvel at the transformation that Spring has wrought.

In the last few days, the trees have gone from a delicate hint of buds and blossoms, to a profusion of new leaves. The vista from our deck has changed from a view of creek and neighboring houses to a small clearing surrounded by seventy-five foot walls of lime green leaves.

We are reminded again that: “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.

Nature has shaken off her winter-induced torpor and is flourishing on every side. It is time for us to do likewise.

But, Spring planting in our neighborhood requires more than hard work and hope. If you want your flowers to flaunt their blooms for all to see, you need altitude, lots of altitude. Our local herds of deer regard flower beds as salad bars.

Last year, I had just put my tools away after putting in a bed of chrysanthemums when a group of curious deer appeared and started sampling the newly planted blooms. When I yelled at them, they lifted their heads and regarded me curiously – then they resumed grazing.

This year, I am ready. I have designed a heavy cedar planter that juts out from a deck or porch rail and will hold up to fifty pounds of potted plants. Neighbors have already begun ordering the planters, because foraging deer rarely climb onto decks. Porches, yes, but raised decks seem to be beyond their abilities.

Once again, adversity creates opportunity. See my Affordable Designs website for some examples of planters which are relatively deer-proof.

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0 Responses to A time to plant – with one difference

  1. Denny says:

    You have the mind of an entrepreneur!

  2. Linda says:

    Gorgeous!
    The other advantage that I can see is that the planter is positioned so the flowers are put out of the reach of little hands.

    ‘Cause, you know, those sorts of things are always at the top of my head. 🙂

    –Linda

  3. oldcatman says:

    Ever try enclosing with “bird netting” it is invisible from a short distances to the human eye–& does keep unwanted creatures out–it keeps eagles out of my chicken yard……

  4. Cindy says:

    What a great idea and it looks beautiful!

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