Building/moving to a new home – day 15

Someone here isn’t helping…

Gretchen and I are working flat out while keeping the house immaculate for prospective buyers who troop through on a daily basis. We seem to be doing well from the comments we get back from the teams of realtors who accompany these buyers.

We also do our best to minimise the trauma inflicted on the two non-voting members of our household, but it seems that we are not doing as well as we thought. For the last few days, there has been an awful odor emanating from my office and I could neither identify it or locate its source.

UnhappycatI thought it might have been the one hundred shipping cartons stacked in the corner, because they do contribute a funky and not pleasant odor, but it wasn’t the cartons. One of the cats, probably Buffy, had sprayed the end of my shipping table to show her displeasure with the state of affairs.

My quick solution was to remove cartons and shipping table from the house and put them in the storage locker. As a result, the house is becoming even more like a model home, with barely enough furniture to show how someone might possibly use the place. This leaves the cats with fewer places to hide and makes them even more nervous when strangers tour the house.

The longer term solution is to ensure that the cats are not confined in the house alone while we are tending to matters in far-off Floyd. They do better when there is an escape route available to them when the doorbell rings. The cat door will be left open while we are gone and it is up to the cats to keep any stray raccoons from coming in.

Many people in Floyd ARE helping

We are heading for Floyd today to meet with some key players in our home-building activity. The footers for the house are ready for inspection. The workshop foundation is well under way. The temporary power stub is ready for inspection and we have a 3:00 PM meeting with a power company engineer to decide how we can get power up the street and in to our house.

When you manage a construction project at a distance, it is reassuring to have reliable contractors on site who coordinate with each other and let you know in advance when you need to get involved. These are the people who are making that possible:

Michael Shortt is a Class A contractor who is doing all of our grading and excavating and is putting in our septic system. His people cleared our homesite and put in a humongeous gravel roadbed to support all of the heavy equipment for the well drilling and the cranes which will drop the modular home units in place.

Bob Eich is a Class B contractor who is building our workshop now and will be doing a lot of the finish work on the house.

Paul Haynes put in our well and found 20 gallons/minute at 320 feet.

Jeff Ligon is a Class B contractor who is building the foundation for the house. This must be complete and ready to receive the house modules which may be delivered in the next 50 days

We have a lot on our plates this trip. We need to decide on a HVAC sytem and installer. We would like to decide on a supplier for the hardwood floors. We must get a decision on running power to the house and workshop. And, finally, we need to check out the Friday Night Jamboree at the Floyd Country store! See the awesome Flash presentation by Doug Thompson of Blue Ridge Muse!

We look forward to seeing Doug , Fred First , Colleen Redman and other Floyd bloggers while we are there. It promises to be a busy three days.

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0 Responses to Building/moving to a new home – day 15

  1. Chris Owen says:

    Are we to assume that the Class A and Class B that you refer to, while also waxing lyrically about your terrific contractors, refers to some qualification rather than their abilities. In other words are you judging their class or has someone else done that already???
    Puzzled Aussie!!!

  2. Good question! Their class determines how large a job they can do.

    In Virginia, a Class A contractor is certified for jobs costing more than $75,000. A Class B contractor is certified for jobs larger than $7,500 and less than $75,000. A Class C contractor is certified for jobs less than $7,500.

    We selected these contractors after consulting many people in Floyd. The local information network is quite accurate. You just ask around until you get the information you need.

  3. Since you are building your own home, you might be interested in the book, Building Your Own Home for Dummies. The book covers the entire process of building a home. Some of what might be helpful for you in your project are parts of the book that cover things such as Ten Common Custom Home Mistakes and How to Avoid Them, or Ten Great Ways to Lower Construction Costs.

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