Playing a better game of life – part 5

The key to enjoying the game of life is to play it in a self-determined manner.

"Easier said than done," you may say, but this is an absolute necessity if you are to stay reasonably sane.  If others control everything you do, you are experiencing a kind of slavery, no matter how kindly these others treat you.

You normally have some control over your life, unless you have broken enough of societies rules that you are deprived of liberty.

On the other hand, far too many of us stupidly give up one freedom after another in order to gain favor with the corporate elite and keep a fat salary coming in.

You will occasionally encounter a hiring manager who interviews you and keeps you off balance all during the interview and yet wants to hire you. Run, do not walk, out of there. This is a variety of toxic individual who will demonstrate his or her insanity constantly by keeping you in check or off balance as long as you work for them.

If you strive to get their approval by pleasing them, you will get led around in circles and will be constantly reminded that you are being kept on only because of their charitable nature because your work is woefully deficient. After a while you will begin to believe it and will be grateful to them. Eeew! Yuck! You need a severe reality adjustment if that is the case.

These people like to keep their employees anxious and afraid for their jobs. They may even pay high starting salaries to attract willing victims. Once you are on board this madhouse, you will find your confidence waning almost immediately. You will be made wrong almost every day and if you stick it out, determined to get them to approve of you, you will be bitterly disappointed.

Some of you may snort and think, "What company would allow such behavior!" This behavior is usually invisible in a large company because this kind of manager is constantly sucking up to higher levels of management. In a smaller company, this behavior is tolerated because the person doing it is the owner or a relative.

It really doesn’t matter whether the company is large or small or whether this manager promises you rewards for your hard work. If you are not being allowed to use your judgment while carrying out your duties, you are merely a "gofer", a minion, no matter how much they pay you.

You will find gofers close to the highest levels in almost any organization. Some executives like to keep minions close to them as though they are fashion accessories. You will not survive well as a fashion accessory or as a minion.

Far better that you choose a path that lets you have more control over your life. Take responsibility for everything that happens to you and you will soon be well on your way to living a self-determined life. There is much more to be said about this, but I think you have the basic idea now.

One more tip: Try to cause only those effects that others can experience easily. You will be amazed how this uncomplicates your life.

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0 Responses to Playing a better game of life – part 5

  1. yoav says:

    This a great post, David!
    However, I suspect that there is a more dangerous mutation of this kind…

    Those who pretend to be friendly in the interviewing process and reveal their true colours later…

    Your advice is still valid for these cases, but detection of the problem is more likely to happen after the new job has started.

  2. colleen says:

    Hi David, Good advice. I wanted to let you know that I posted on self-publishing yesterday. I think you might appreciate it.
    —–
    PING:
    TITLE: Playing The Game of Life
    URL: http://www.adriansavage.com/blog/_archives/2005/9/6/1202240.html
    IP: 216.40.34.103
    BLOG NAME: The Coyote Within
    DATE: 09/06/2005 11:00:07 AM
    David St. Lawrence at Ripples has been running a great series of postings called “Playing a Better Game of Life.” Here are some things that jumped out for me.

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